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View Full Version : Your "Stereotypical" Canadian Quirks...


MattB
05-15-2009, 09:24 PM
Well...I was thinking about starting a hockey thread so we could all commiserate over none of our teams winning the Cup again this year, as usual, but I changed my mind since I figured the late not-so-great Hyde Park wouldn't be able to hold a candle to a thread like that for fireworks and sheer brutality...

Then I got to thinking...y'know, the rest of the non-Canadians on the boards probably expect us to have a hockey thread down here! I started pondering stereotypical Canadians, how we are often portrayed by media/entertainers in other countries, and I realized that I am (I...AM...) like that sometimes! So let's give them what they want/expect to hear from us...List your TRUE Canadian quirks!!! I'll go first...These are all basically real about me, even if they seem less than serious...

1. I like hockey...no...I LOVE HOCKEY!!! (I used to love Baseball more, until the MAN took away my beloved Expos!!)
1A. My self worth corresponds to the success of the Ottawa Senators. Therefore I'm currently worthless...:(
2. I wear a toque from September through April.
3. I pronounce "Toronto" as "Tronna".
4. I've already had a poutine twice this week, and I may not be done yet...
5. I have relatives who think my fiancee may be too fat, but they never come out and say it outright, and justify it by saying that "At least she'll be warmer in the winter"...(Threw that in there in honour of the Dim boards, I suspect this may also be true in Minnesota...)
6. I spell "honour" and "colour" with a 'u' and sometimes I throuw extra 'u's in outher wourds just to be diffucult...
7. I have cousins who act like Bob and Doug MacKenzie- not on purpose.
8. I say "Pretty cold, eh?" to others when it's -40c with the windchill.

Oh man, I could go on forever but, it's like, your turn eh?

goodthings
05-21-2009, 10:02 AM
oops...sorry

Tad
05-21-2009, 10:16 AM
- I've made maple syrup, and refuse to use any of those artificial syrups, only real maple syrup for me!

- I own much more winter sporting gear (skates, cross country skis, downhill skis, sleds, curling broom, broom hockey stick) than summer sporting gear (swimsuit, bicycle).

- I don't mind the cold so long as it is a dry cold.

- I pronounce place names in Vermont in their original french pronunciation, much to the confusion of the locals (They have no idea were "MOHn-pell-Yee-ay" is, yet it is their state capital!?!)

- I frequently get giddy about the selection and prices when shopping down state-side.

- Only two of my grandparents were born in Canada.

- I like bloody Ceasars

- I like vinegar on my fries.

SpecialK
05-21-2009, 11:21 AM
Ed, vinegar on your fries? Surely you mean mayo! ;)

And goodthings, I laughed out loud at your typical Canadian apology. heehee!! Rep for that.

I don't have booster cables in the car, but I do have a blanket and ice scraper year round. Oh, and a pair of figure skates at the moment.

Even as a girl who couldn't care less about sports, I can hold my own in a conversation about hockey.

I own flannel.... both sheets and 'lingerie' ;)

Tad
05-21-2009, 11:26 AM
I own flannel.... both sheets and 'lingerie' ;)

Doesn't everybody? :blink:

And I thought of another one: I have a bag of sand in the trunk of my car.

SpecialK
05-21-2009, 11:29 AM
I can probably sing the national anthem in French better than I can in English!

I haven't been to Timmy's yet today... but I will.

goodthings
05-21-2009, 10:18 PM
Doesn't everybody? :blink:

And I thought of another one: I have a bag of sand in the trunk of my car.

cat litter for me...

Tad
05-22-2009, 07:55 AM
I have a bag of sand in the trunk of my car.

cat litter for me...

.....that I could have a discussion on the relative merits of the two approaches quoted above :eek:

Aimmer
05-22-2009, 02:00 PM
My Canadian Quirks:

- I enjoy my double doubles, and beaver tails - esp with cinnamon and lemon juice mmmm
- Gimme some peameal bacon with those eggs please
- if it gets to be above 30 degrees I'm staying home - bring me back some snow please
- I also check the weather religiously every morning - who knows what it will be.
- I kept a bag of birdseed in the back of my car :)
- Im a Canadian Tire money millionaire (or at least it looks like it in that drawer I keep it all in)
- no mayo on the fries but there is MALT vinegar
- I can hold my liquor better then the counterparts to the south of us.
- I never miss You never miss "Coach's Corner" during Hockey Night in Canada - just to see what Don Cherry is wearing this week.
- I own all of the Tragically Hips albums.
- I've been a skiier for Halloween just because it was snowing and too cold to be a princess instead.

steely
05-22-2009, 06:52 PM
Canada sounds like a blast.:D

olwen
05-22-2009, 07:09 PM
- I've made maple syrup, and refuse to use any of those artificial syrups, only real maple syrup for me!

- I own much more winter sporting gear (skates, cross country skis, downhill skis, sleds, curling broom, broom hockey stick) than summer sporting gear (swimsuit, bicycle).

- I don't mind the cold so long as it is a dry cold.

- I pronounce place names in Vermont in their original french pronunciation, much to the confusion of the locals (They have no idea were "MOHn-pell-Yee-ay" is, yet it is their state capital!?!)

- I frequently get giddy about the selection and prices when shopping down state-side.

- Only two of my grandparents were born in Canada.

- I like bloody Ceasars

- I like vinegar on my fries.

That's what that malted vinegar was for! :doh: I had fish and chips in Burlington, VT a couple months ago and there was vinegar on the table in the restaurant and I couldn't figure out why. It occurred to me that it might be a substitute for hot sauce and since there was no hot sauce I figured the locals don't like spicy. I put the vinegar on the fish, not the fries! Tasted okay too. It improved an otherwise bland meal.

Esther
05-23-2009, 11:46 PM
- Imagine a Canadian man. You probably imagined my boyfriend.
(Stocky, bearded, beer-loving, French-Canadian former hockey player. Frequently seen wearing red plaid flannel under a black leather jacket with a toque.)

- I too wear toques all year.

- When I hear my own voice on recording, it actually DOES sound like I'm saying "hoose" and "aboot".

- I frequently wear boots with dresses when it's cold out. (Which is over half the year)

SpecialK
05-24-2009, 04:23 AM
My Canadian Quirks:

- I enjoy my double doubles, and beaver tails - esp with cinnamon and lemon juice mmmm
- if it gets to be above 30 degrees I'm staying home - bring me back some snow please
- Im a Canadian Tire money millionaire (or at least it looks like it in that drawer I keep it all in)
- no mayo on the fries but there is MALT vinegar


Mmmn! Beavertails with cinnamon and lemon juice! Delish!!

And yeah, I hate hot, humid summers. Give me the snow any day!

SpecialK
05-24-2009, 03:31 PM
Okay, I'm such a dork....

I went across the border to do a bit of shopping this afternoon and while I was there I stopped for lunch at a fast food place in the mall. Well, I didn't get any napkins with my order so I asked.... for a serviette. The person working behind the counter laughed "A what?!"

I'm such a Canadian! :D

MattB
05-25-2009, 09:58 AM
My Canadian Quirks:
- I also check the weather religiously every morning - who knows what it will be.
- Im a Canadian Tire money millionaire (or at least it looks like it in that drawer I keep it all in)
- I never miss You never miss "Coach's Corner" during Hockey Night in Canada - just to see what Don Cherry is wearing this week.

Me too!!

-
- When I hear my own voice on recording, it actually DOES sound like I'm saying "hoose" and "aboot".


Yup, me too...apparently I have an accent, but I don't hear it...

Okay, I'm such a dork....

I went across the border to do a bit of shopping this afternoon and while I was there I stopped for lunch at a fast food place in the mall. Well, I didn't get any napkins with my order so I asked.... for a serviette. The person working behind the counter laughed "A what?!"

I'm such a Canadian! :D

Try telling them you had a double-double on the chesterfield during a chinook and see what they say...

Melian
05-26-2009, 01:04 PM
This thread really makes me think. I'm not very stereotypically Canadian:

I hate Tim Horton's.
I'd rather be dead than watch Corner Gas or any other Canadian programming (ok ok...EXCEPT Trailer Park Boys).
Americans have told me that I don't have the "Canadian accent."
I think flannel should be banned, lol.
I don't own anything that has a Canadian flag on it.
I try not to leave the house in the winter (or the summer, really....).
I don't drink beer, nor do I eat bacon.
I basically hate all Canadian bands.

Yet, international friends always seem to know that I'm Canadian based on one quality: apparently, I'm too nice and apologize all the time. Hahaha...oh and I played hockey for six years :p

Tad
05-26-2009, 01:11 PM
This thread really makes me think. I'm not very stereotypically Canadian:



Well, you were born and raised in the Greater Toronto Area, so whadyaexpect? :D

Burke_Rakers
05-27-2009, 02:56 AM
First of all, you would not BELIEVE how much of this counts for rural Michigan and the rest of the lake area.

The only thing I can say about the accent, is that few people believe they have one...till it's pointed out. I currently live in Indiana, and the locals insert R's into words that have no R's, such as "Warshing" their clothes. I know several Doctor WHO fans here who call the DALEKS the DARLEKS.

Also, they don't borrow anything. They "Bar-Ree".

But here I am, certain that I don't have an accent. Does anyone recognize a Michigan accent? I've spent too much time in Florida and Indiana to recognize my owh accent anymore.

As far as Canada goes, you may love our stores...but I grew up LOVING your television. Doctor WHO and Monty Python were big parts of my youth, long before they were available on PBS.

Also, I grew up with both the NFL...and the CFL. Anyone out there Tigercat Fans?

Esther
05-27-2009, 08:34 AM
I'd rather be dead than watch Corner Gas or any other Canadian programming (ok ok...EXCEPT Trailer Park Boys).


Oh man, I agree with you here. I don't even like Trailer Park Boys. Most Canadian programming is horrendous.
Apparently people in Scotland love Due South, though!

Aimmer
05-27-2009, 12:01 PM
I don't know I've found Canadian programming improving. I do like Corner Gas and TPB sometimes but I especially enjoy the Rick Mercer show, and The Hour. And Flashpoint is an awesome show too and was even picked up by NBC or CBS in the states.

Melian
05-27-2009, 12:08 PM
Well, you were born and raised in the Greater Toronto Area, so whadyaexpect? :D

:p:p:p:p:p:p:p:p:p

luscious_lulu
05-27-2009, 05:07 PM
Also, I grew up with both the NFL...and the CFL. Anyone out there Tigercat Fans?

Yes! Well, supporter. They've been playing very poorly the past few years. I can't say I'm a fan of the loosing.

olwen
05-27-2009, 08:24 PM
I'd like to add all the Degrassi shows to the good canadian show list. Not to mention all your Canadian actor imports. There's tons of those. Oh and I remember this cartoon show from the film board of canada that aired on HBO a long time ago...I think it had short silent animated films....I wish I could remember what they were all about. :(

Esther
05-27-2009, 10:41 PM
I'd like to add all the Degrassi shows to the good canadian show list. Not to mention all your Canadian actor imports. There's tons of those. Oh and I remember this cartoon show from the film board of canada that aired on HBO a long time ago...I think it had short silent animated films....I wish I could remember what they were all about. :(


You know what, I totally forgot about those animated shorts. Apparently Canada is quite famous for experimental animation. I watched a ton of those as a kid.
You can find a lot of them here, though not all of the films are available to watch for free:
http://www3.nfb.ca/animation/objanim/en/films/
You can search by director or title. I find title a bit easier because sometimes the name jogs my memory and it turns out to be something I've seen before. Looking by production year helps, too.

Tad
05-28-2009, 07:24 AM
Hmmm, I'd think that the Canadian stereotype is watching almost solely American TV shows? :p

I'm actually a fan of a fair bit of Canadian TV, although my favorite shows tend to not last long.....Made In Canada did have a few (too short) seasons as did DaVinci's Inquest, but Intelligence, This is Wonderland, and a number of others over the years were canned just when they were getting really good.

chachi3000
05-28-2009, 09:40 AM
I was born in Canada, I don't like hockey, don't drink beer, haven't had poutine in years, only wear a toque when it's cold out, and I have to force myself to spell 'centre' and 'honour' properly. And I don't say 'eh?' ever. I feel like I'm missing out on something..

Ernest Nagel
05-28-2009, 10:49 AM
I've worked with and been friends with a good many Canadians over the years (non-Quebecois, as it happens) and I can only say I've never met a more helpful lot of people in my life. I'm an Okie and while we have the typical rural neighborliness Canadians make us look like trolls. They invariably notice when someone is struggling and take time to support them no matter how busy they are. Not sure if this decency and generosity are truly characteristic or if I've just been fortunate to encounter the cream of the crop?

What do you guys think? Are you just better people than us Yanks or what? Srsly. :confused:

Tad
05-28-2009, 01:45 PM
Actually, at least by stereotype, we are polite but not so neighborly. Canadians moving to the states often report in awe about how friendly and helpful their neighbors are.....things like offering to help move them in or help with needed house repairs before even knowing them.

But then again, people who move out of country are often not typical in many ways. Amongst other things I think it makes most people a little more aware, because there is so much new, so they might be more mindful?

Burke_Rakers
05-28-2009, 08:14 PM
Yes! Well, supporter. They've been playing very poorly the past few years. I can't say I'm a fan of the loosing.

Poor play doesn't bother me too much. Being Detroit born, I'm also a fan of the Lions...and am thus used to cheering for unlucky felines :blush:

luscious_lulu
05-30-2009, 07:29 AM
Poor play doesn't bother me too much. Being Detroit born, I'm also a fan of the Lions...and am thus used to cheering for unlucky felines :blush:

*hugs* damn feline teams need to get their act together.

Hamilton has been reporting poor seasons tickets sales this year and are begging the fans not to give up on them. We'll see... :p

gypsy
05-31-2009, 10:16 AM
Okay, I'm such a dork....

I went across the border to do a bit of shopping this afternoon and while I was there I stopped for lunch at a fast food place in the mall. Well, I didn't get any napkins with my order so I asked.... for a serviette. The person working behind the counter laughed "A what?!"

I'm such a Canadian! :D

LOL! See, these are the thing you never realise are different until you go somewhere else. The first time I was at the Jersey bash I was feeling nauseous The Day After Drinking, so I asked if anyone had any Gravol. "Gravel?!??! For what?" Berna said...

Then in April I said I had to go to the washroom, and someone said... you're going to do your laundry...now?

*snort*

chillaxin
05-31-2009, 03:52 PM
Also, I grew up with both the NFL...and the CFL. Anyone out there Tigercat Fans?

Oskee wee wee!! I grew up in the Hammer and still come in from the Loo to see games when I can. And I love the Giants, too.

goodthings
06-07-2009, 09:05 AM
Well, you were born and raised in the Greater Toronto Area, so whadyaexpect? :D


Heehee......

Surlysomething
06-08-2009, 08:35 AM
There's a LOT of amazing Canadian music. Seriously, don't get me started.

Canadian tv though...well, I love the news shows. Passionate Eye, The Hour, etc. Early Da Vinci code was great too.

Canadian film could catch up thought but I do love me some Dance Me Outside and earlier Sandra Oh movies (filmed in Vancouver).

I made the switch to Timmy's coffee because it's consistent in taste and it's mad cheap. But I get it at the Esso Timmy's coffee bar instead of the actual Timmy's. Tastes better for some reason.

And Americans always tell me they love my accent. What accent? :)

MattB
08-19-2009, 08:19 PM
And I thought of another one: I have a bag of sand in the trunk of my car.

A Canucklehead moment for me...

Hottest, most humid, week of the year. 37C with the humidity. (98.6F) I'm sweating buckets...I'm making space in the trunk of my car. I find my telescopic, super-duper, ice scraper/snow brush. I think to myself..."Well, I don't need this right now." So I take it out and put it aside...

...then I look at it again...

...and again...

...and again...

...then I put it back in the trunk.

Because you just never know!!

Tad
08-20-2009, 06:55 AM
*LMAO*

Yah...I have my snow brushes in the car still.....that way won't be caught off guard in the fall

Tad
11-02-2009, 11:45 AM
This is more of a "You might be Canadian if..." moment....

....when the national newscast (not the sports, the news) dedicates a minute or so to it being the fiftieth anniversary of the first in-game use of a goalie mask! Because that is the news that counts :p

jenboo
11-04-2009, 10:26 PM
oops...sorry

heehee, so true goodthings:)

jenboo
11-04-2009, 10:32 PM
I don't know I've found Canadian programming improving. I do like Corner Gas and TPB sometimes but I especially enjoy the Rick Mercer show, and The Hour. And Flashpoint is an awesome show too and was even picked up by NBC or CBS in the states.

Kids in the hall back in the day. Degrassi (all the schools), wild roses, sctv, four on the floor, w5, I could go on and have to admit that I do like Canadian TV and find it odd that others do not see the cultural relevance of Relic (please tell me you know this reference) or the littlest Hobo.

jenboo
11-04-2009, 10:34 PM
I'd like to add all the Degrassi shows to the good canadian show list. Not to mention all your Canadian actor imports. There's tons of those. Oh and I remember this cartoon show from the film board of canada that aired on HBO a long time ago...I think it had short silent animated films....I wish I could remember what they were all about. :(

and the cat came back the very next day, the cat came back, thought he was a goner but the cat came back the very next day - o - eh

MattB
11-05-2009, 04:36 AM
Kids in the hall back in the day. Degrassi (all the schools), wild roses, sctv, four on the floor, w5, I could go on and have to admit that I do like Canadian TV and find it odd that others do not see the cultural relevance of Relic (please tell me you know this reference) or the littlest Hobo.

If by cultural relevance you mean Relic-style fashion. I saw about 50 or so "Relics" in downtown Ottawa yesterday. Toque season is coming. Oh, and thank you for getting the Littlest Hobo theme stuck in my head. A great way to start the day...:doh:

and the cat came back the very next day, the cat came back, thought he was a goner but the cat came back the very next day - o - eh

Oh the NFB...Every time I pass their building in Montreal on the 40 I think "We combed our hair like Maurice Richard...we taped our stick like Maurice Richard...we all wore the number 9 jersey of Maurice Richard..." and so on...

MattB
11-05-2009, 04:41 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cD5pctWlzpk

Pure evil...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PINxfouNQFw

Tad
11-05-2009, 05:56 AM
*glares at Jenboo* great, now I have "The cat came back...." stuck in my head! ARRRGGGHHHHH!!!!!!

I do like a lot of Canadian TV, too. Although most of my favorite shows didn't last all that long (Intelligence, This is Wonderland, Made in Canada .... ). And of course I know who Relic is, even though I don't think I ever watched a complete episode of The Beachcombers in my life....just one of those cultural knowledge things I guess?

bigmac
11-05-2009, 06:11 AM
Kids in the hall back in the day. Degrassi (all the schools), wild roses, sctv, four on the floor, w5, I could go on and have to admit that I do like Canadian TV and find it odd that others do not see the cultural relevance of Relic (please tell me you know this reference) or the littlest Hobo.

Lets not forget Street Legal (my all time favorite) -- the partners never get to do the associates on the desk in American legal dramas.

I'll get back to you on the cultural relevance of homeless dogs and near homeless people. Got to say that I liked Relic better than Nick.

GTAFA
11-05-2009, 08:52 AM
I guess this thread has turned into a discussion of Canadian TV (which has had its ups and downs). It means it's no different here than anyplace else.

I like a lot of what's on CBC these days. Is there a better interviewer anywhere than Strombo (George Strombolopoulus) of The Hour? And while I enjoy SNL, there isn't anything on TV that makes me laugh harder than the one-two punch of Rick Mercer Report followed by This Hour Has 22 Minutes. While I used to love the earlier versions of these shows (and loved the old one-two punch of CODCO & Kids in the Hall), they're excellent right now. And Being Erika is also a wonderful show.

Little Mosque on the Prairie? now that's more like the old-fashioned CBC I know, trying to be politically correct whether anyone likes it or not; while i am sure somebody must enjoy this show, i think it's mediocre compared to the other shows. Corner Gas was way better.

Surlysomething
11-05-2009, 12:23 PM
I guess this thread has turned into a discussion of Canadian TV (which has had its ups and downs). It means it's no different here than anyplace else.

I like a lot of what's on CBC these days. Is there a better interviewer anywhere than Strombo (George Strombolopoulus) of The Hour? And while I enjoy SNL, there isn't anything on TV that makes me laugh harder than the one-two punch of Rick Mercer Report followed by This Hour Has 22 Minutes. While I used to love the earlier versions of these shows (and loved the old one-two punch of CODCO & Kids in the Hall), they're excellent right now. And Being Erika is also a wonderful show.

Little Mosque on the Prairie? now that's more like the old-fashioned CBC I know, trying to be politically correct whether anyone likes it or not; while i am sure somebody must enjoy this show, i think it's mediocre compared to the other shows. Corner Gas was way better.

The Hour is the best show on late night tv, hands down.

Tad
11-05-2009, 01:46 PM
How could I have forgotten to mention Strombo! I agree, very good.

jenboo
11-05-2009, 05:59 PM
I dont know if this is something other Canadians do/feel, but I don;t think it is officially cold until my snot freezes in my nose.

I think umbrella's are for pussies

I will wear socks with my sandals

The bottom of my purse is a goldmine of loons and twoons when broke just before pay day

The only giant I know is friendly

I blast the heat in my car and open my window for fresh air

Mullets are a lifestyle choice

Oh and I think the host of the hour is a bit of a douche bag, now if rick the temp took over that would be sooooooo different

Surlysomething
11-05-2009, 06:14 PM
I dont know if this is something other Canadians do/feel, but I don;t think it is officially cold until my snot freezes in my nose.

I think umbrella's are for pussies
You must not live in Vancouver

I will wear socks with my sandals
That is so wrong.

The bottom of my purse is a goldmine of loons and twoons when broke just before pay day
I too have lived off of these coins more than once.

The only giant I know is friendly
and Captain Kangaroo!

I blast the heat in my car and open my window for fresh air
And here I thought I was the only one.

Mullets are a lifestyle choice
Fubar!

Oh and I think the host of the hour is a bit of a douche bag, now if rick the temp took over that would be sooooooo different
Strombo is smoking hot. Rick the Temp is the Canadian Seacrest. *hurl*

My comments are in red. Haha.

MattB
11-05-2009, 08:19 PM
I guess this thread has turned into a discussion of Canadian TV (which has had its ups and downs). It means it's no different here than anyplace else...

Ah! But don't you see? Talking about Canadian TV IS a stereotypical Canadian quirk, because it always ends up like this...

"I hate most Canadian shows, especially (insert show here...uhhh, let's say "Front Page Challenge"...) but I really love (insert second show here...Danger Bay??).

...and then you effectively end the conversation with...

"Hey! You remember the theme song to (insert 'classic' 3rd show..."Thrill Of A Lifetime")??

DENOUEMENT: Then your friend goes..."Yeah, I remember that song!" and they start singing the melody from the theme song from "Definition" because they just don't remember "Thrill Of A Lifetime" at all....

Add a medium double-double and you have your quirk!

Commander Keen
11-05-2009, 08:22 PM
I get my milk in bags, I love poutine, and I'm afraid of the dark.

The last one is a How I Met Your Mother reference :P
I mean, come on, I play Silent Hill with all the lights off and the sound way up. No way that last one could be true :rolleyes:

MattB
11-05-2009, 08:28 PM
Just thought of another one...

First snow of any substance fell in Ottawa today, and it fell mostly during rush hour. Of course the panic was widespread. Cars alternatingly slowing down or speeding up and causing general havoc in conditions similar to a medium spring rainfall. A quirk to be sure, but the real quirk will be in February when some southern U.S. state gets snow or freezing rain and the volume of traffic accidents gets on the news, and the same people panicking on the 417 today will sit back all smug and say...

"Crazy Bastards...can't even handle a little snow..."

GTAFA
11-05-2009, 08:55 PM
Today was positively schizophrenic in Toronto. I went naively for a walk to my favourite place in Kensington. I left my sweater and gloves behind because the sun was shining. By the time my coffee and banana bread (with huge chocolate chunks!) were wending their way down my throat, as i looked out the window, I saw the couple at the outdoor cafe scurry for cover, as ice pellets began to fall. By the time i got back to my office the wind was howling mad, and a bit of cold rain was falling.

An hour later the sun pouring through my office window had me irritated at how HOT it had become.

It was like GOD was sitting in one of those restaurants where you can't decide what to order,... "hm i think i want some winter... no wait, i really love that summer.... but i gotta have some winter".

Please sir/madam, could you decide? it's way easier if i know which way to dress, and then just accept it...?

GTAFA
11-05-2009, 09:01 PM
Ah! But don't you see? Talking about Canadian TV IS a stereotypical Canadian quirk...

And don't forget that other Canadian sport, spotting the expat Canadian on American TV. It's like a vicarious pleasure, watching them star on US television, a mini-invasion.

Although I'm not envious, considering how many of them end up dying untimely deaths... I like my obscurity just fine.

MattB
11-06-2009, 04:40 AM
And don't forget that other Canadian sport, spotting the expat Canadian on American TV. It's like a vicarious pleasure, watching them star on US television, a mini-invasion.

Although I'm not envious, considering how many of them end up dying untimely deaths... I like my obscurity just fine.

There has always seemed to be a disporportionate amount of Canadians on American TV, given our population. Someone should capitalize on this and open up some sort of training facility or school so we can churn out even more comedians, news anchors and game show hosts. I'm only half kidding, really...

Something that has always irritated me, since TV is a topic on here now, is the "Canadian Version" of U.S. shows...Canadian Idol, ET Canada, Canada's Next Top Model, Deal Or No Deal Canada and so on. I'm not trying to offend anyone who may like those shows, it just seems to me to be very unoriginal and uninspired tagging Canada at the end of an established program idea and putting it on the air. Now having said that...if those shows spare us from "Littlest Hobo"-type shows, maybe it's not a bad thing.

Tad
11-06-2009, 09:02 AM
OK, this one is not entirely stereotypical, but where else can you buy two-fingered ("lobster") gloves for cycling in the cold weather? (each 'finger' of hte glove holds two of your fingers, so you can hold onto the handle bar while still flicking gear levers or working brakes, but they are warmer than conventional gloves). Likewise, where else can you buy studded bicycle tires for biking in winter? (I have the former, but not the latter....I draw the line at having snow or ice on the roads).

Also, how many of you have one of those sort of spiky looking plastic things that sit on a heat vent, for drying gloves/boots/socks in the winter?

Commander Keen
11-06-2009, 02:07 PM
Today was positively schizophrenic in Toronto. I went naively for a walk to my favourite place in Kensington. I left my sweater and gloves behind because the sun was shining. By the time my coffee and banana bread (with huge chocolate chunks!) were wending their way down my throat, as i looked out the window, I saw the couple at the outdoor cafe scurry for cover, as ice pellets began to fall. By the time i got back to my office the wind was howling mad, and a bit of cold rain was falling.

An hour later the sun pouring through my office window had me irritated at how HOT it had become.

It was like GOD was sitting in one of those restaurants where you can't decide what to order,... "hm i think i want some winter... no wait, i really love that summer.... but i gotta have some winter".

Please sir/madam, could you decide? it's way easier if i know which way to dress, and then just accept it...?

I live in Kensington market :D
I heard the hail storm and at first I was confused and then, "oh yeah, Canada." :rolleyes: We tend to get some pretty strange weather...

Melian
11-08-2009, 11:51 AM
Today was positively schizophrenic in Toronto. I went naively for a walk to my favourite place in Kensington. I left my sweater and gloves behind because the sun was shining. By the time my coffee and banana bread (with huge chocolate chunks!) were wending their way down my throat, as i looked out the window, I saw the couple at the outdoor cafe scurry for cover, as ice pellets began to fall. By the time i got back to my office the wind was howling mad, and a bit of cold rain was falling.

An hour later the sun pouring through my office window had me irritated at how HOT it had become.

It was like GOD was sitting in one of those restaurants where you can't decide what to order,... "hm i think i want some winter... no wait, i really love that summer.... but i gotta have some winter".

Please sir/madam, could you decide? it's way easier if i know which way to dress, and then just accept it...?

I live in Kensington market :D
I heard the hail storm and at first I was confused and then, "oh yeah, Canada." :rolleyes: We tend to get some pretty strange weather...

I was in Kensington for the hailstorm(s) too! The husband and I were at Big Fat Burrito....having burritos. LOL!

ETA: and we were laughing maniacally at the people running for cover as they were pelted with golfball sized chunks of ice, while we sat in our warm little tin can of restaurant (BFB is such a dive, but soooo good).

MattB
11-08-2009, 01:20 PM
Nothing like a plus 15c November day in Ottawa less than a week after having the snow fall...

Canadians talk about the weather all of the time because it screws around with us so much...

Tad
11-09-2009, 07:35 AM
Nothing like a plus 15c November day in Ottawa less than a week after having the snow fall...

Canadians talk about the weather all of the time because it screws around with us so much...

Re: the first sentence--no kidding, was out walking around the neighborhood shops, and son and I both shed our jackets and were fine in short sleeves (son was also in shorts!). In November, in Ottawa. Weird (but nice) :)

Re: the second sentence--I've always wondered what people in San Diego talk about (they have almost no weather variation there) :eek:

Melian
11-09-2009, 02:05 PM
Re: the second sentence--I've always wondered what people in San Diego talk about (they have almost no weather variation there) :eek:

The answer: biotechnology ;)

MattB
02-23-2010, 06:47 AM
It was a beautiful sunny day yesterday, and instead of getting my car washed* I knew we were getting snow today so I skipped it. The snow will clean the car for me...Quirk...

(*My car was at that point where even if I brushed by it slightly I got a big shmear of salt and whatever along the side of my pants and/or jacket...Typical Canadian winter fashion...)

GTAFA
02-23-2010, 06:27 PM
It was a beautiful sunny day yesterday, and instead of getting my car washed* I knew we were getting snow today so I skipped it. The snow will clean the car for me...Quirk...

(*My car was at that point where even if I brushed by it slightly I got a big shmear of salt and whatever along the side of my pants and/or jacket...Typical Canadian winter fashion...)

TRUE! i was staring at the dirt a couple of days ago, aware of the upcoming snow in the forecast and grateful that i'd literally get a clean slate. Sigh, today the salt is back on the road where it belongs.

Esther
02-23-2010, 11:18 PM
(*My car was at that point where even if I brushed by it slightly I got a big shmear of salt and whatever along the side of my pants and/or jacket...Typical Canadian winter fashion...)


UGH. I hate this!! During the winter there is usually a huge smudge of mud or salt on the back of my legs from getting out of the car. I usually don't notice it until I've walked around at work all day looking like a dirtbag :(

jenboo
02-24-2010, 09:47 AM
UGH. I hate this!! During the winter there is usually a huge smudge of mud or salt on the back of my legs from getting out of the car. I usually don't notice it until I've walked around at work all day looking like a dirtbag :(

up north we would get chinooks. During one of these i had my window open in my car and went through a puddle so deep that i got splashed and ended up "drinking" dirty, salty winter water. SO disgusting

MattB
02-24-2010, 12:16 PM
up north we would get chinooks. During one of these i had my window open in my car and went through a puddle so deep that i got splashed and ended up "drinking" dirty, salty winter water. SO disgusting

Ah yes...the famous 'Grande Prairie Milkshake'. Good times...

jenboo
02-24-2010, 08:10 PM
Ah yes...the famous 'Grande Prairie Milkshake'. Good times...

did you live in grand prairie?

MattB
02-25-2010, 05:28 AM
did you live in grand prairie?

lol!:) Nope. You mentioned 'chinook' and 'up north' and Grande Prairie was the first place I thought of...

TallFatSue
02-25-2010, 06:40 AM
I'm a lifelong Ohio gal, but Tim Horton's have made major inroads into the Toledo area, and their baked goodies have made major inroads into my figure. I love them, I drive past one every day, and if I'm not careful my car just drives itself into their parking lot, parks itself next to their door, and refuses to leave until I go in and buy a dozen of something. :eat2:

Apart from the stereotypes, I've noticed Canadians seem well informed about the world at large, and know more (but not as much as they think) about the United States than many Americans. A few weeks ago my husband & I took a Caribbean cruise with my brother & his wife. One day we sat next to a couple from Edmonton, Alberta. My husband Art is an engineer and a man of few words, but next thing I knew he was just talking away about the oil sands (yawn... :rolleyes: ) in Alberta and the diamond mines (perk! :D ) up in the Northwest Territories. They were flattered Art actually knew something about their own province. That couple also joked that when they visit the United States, they replace "eh?" with "huh?" in their speech and they fit right in. ;)

As to the French Canadians, well, thanks to my grandmother I know enough French to sound like I know what I'm talking about, but their Québécois accents are hard. Even so, we've had great service in hotels and restaurants in Montréal and Québec City, and some of the best meals I've eaten anywhere. It was pretty cool to walk past some of their cafés and be able to read the daily specials posted in the windows, like "homard frais" (mmm, fresh lobster). :eat2:

PS. Art should know better than to talk about diamond mines in my presence, especially when our next cruise port was St. Thomas. We met a couple from Manitoba on our cruise who seemed to know most of the jewelry dealers in St. Thomas. I got pretty friendly with the jewelry myself. :)

MattB
02-25-2010, 06:51 AM
snip

Apart from the stereotypes, I've noticed Canadians seem well informed about the world at large, and know more (but not as much as they think) about the United States than many Americans. A few weeks ago my husband & I took a Caribbean cruise with my brother & his wife. One day we sat next to a couple from Edmonton, Alberta. My husband Art is an engineer and a man of few words, but next thing I knew he was just talking away about the oil sands (yawn... :rolleyes: ) in Alberta and the diamond mines (perk! :D ) up in the Northwest Territories. They were flattered Art actually knew something about their own province. That couple also joked that when they visit the United States, they replace "eh?" with "huh?" in their speech and they fit right in. ;)

As to the French Canadians, well, thanks to my grandmother I know enough French to sound like I know what I'm talking about, but their Québécois accents are hard. Even so, we've had great service in hotels and restaurants in Montréal and Québec City, and some of the best meals I've eaten anywhere. It was pretty cool to walk past some of their cafés and be able to read the daily specials posted in the windows, like "homard frais" (mmm, fresh lobster). :eat2:
snip

I personally know more about American history than Canadian history. Partly by choice because I've always been fascinated by the U.S., but also because Canadians don't seem as much into their own history as Americans. Not everyone mind you, but enough...Knowing history is one thing, but you don't get a true feel for a country unless you try living there for a bit. Anyone who spends time in the others' country usually 'gets it' a lot better...

Of course, as has been mentioned often before, Canadians really fixate on the U.S.A., for both good and bad reasons. You drive us crazy...:)

As to Quebec- Foodie Paradise! Always has been...

Esther
02-25-2010, 07:35 AM
I personally know more about American history than Canadian history. Partly by choice because I've always been fascinated by the U.S., but also because Canadians don't seem as much into their own history as Americans.Not everyone mind you, but enough...Knowing history is one thing, but you don't get a true feel for a country unless you try living there for a bit. Anyone who spends time in the others' country usually 'gets it' a lot better...


You know what, I've noticed that too. I've taken a lot of Canadian literature classes and so I've been forced to think about the concept of our national identity quite a lot... and I've come to realize that the whole idea is very, very shaky. I've noticed a distinct disinterest in Canadian history and in the idea of national pride... and I've definitely noticed that strange fascination with the United States. It's almost as if we want to know about the U.S. so we can say, "I may not know what "Canadian" is, but I do know that we're not Americans. Stop painting us with the same brush." I've heard a lot of people say that a lack of national identity (or as Mike Myers put it "the essence of not being") is what defines us the most!

MattB
02-25-2010, 08:00 AM
You know what, I've noticed that too. I've taken a lot of Canadian literature classes and so I've been forced to think about the concept of our national identity quite a lot... and I've come to realize that the whole idea is very, very shaky. I've noticed a distinct disinterest in Canadian history and in the idea of national pride... and I've definitely noticed that strange fascination with the United States. It's almost as if we want to know about the U.S. so we can say, "I may not know what "Canadian" is, but I do know that we're not Americans. Stop painting us with the same brush." I've heard a lot of people say that a lack of national identity (or as Mike Myers put it "the essence of not being") is what defines us the most!

From my perspective, I think we gloss over our history way too much while the Americans aren't afraid to own their history- both the good and bad sides of it. No country's history is perfect, but I have a deep admiration for what the U.S. and Canada have both accomplished over only the last 400 years or so. There will always be challenges...

On another note...I absolutely LOVE the "Own The Podium" attitude at the Olympics, even though I'm usually not big on the Olympics in general. Critics say it's too much pressure on the athletes, but it's so unlike us I find it refreshing. I don't see it as a negative at all, I see it as a long overdue confidence in our abilities we really need up here.

I read a book once called "Why I Hate Canadians" (written by a Canadian, of course) and one of the points about us was, unlike Americans, the 'Canadian Dream' was success without effort. (Or something to that effect...) Instead of pushing ourselves to succeed, we sit back and hope it comes to us. (Like the lottery, which I plan to win someday...:rolleyes:) It was a tremendously defeatist way of looking at us, but kind of accurate too...

GTAFA
02-25-2010, 09:01 AM
From my perspective, I think we gloss over our history way too much while the Americans aren't afraid to own their history- both the good and bad sides of it. No country's history is perfect, but I have a deep admiration for what the U.S. and Canada have both accomplished over only the last 400 years or so. There will always be challenges...

On another note...I absolutely LOVE the "Own The Podium" attitude at the Olympics, even though I'm usually not big on the Olympics in general. Critics say it's too much pressure on the athletes, but it's so unlike us I find it refreshing. I don't see it as a negative at all, I see it as a long overdue confidence in our abilities we really need up here.

I read a book once called "Why I Hate Canadians" (written by a Canadian, of course) and one of the points about us was, unlike Americans, the 'Canadian Dream' was success without effort. (Or something to that effect...) Instead of pushing ourselves to succeed, we sit back and hope it comes to us. (Like the lottery, which I plan to win someday...:rolleyes:) It was a tremendously defeatist way of looking at us, but kind of accurate too...

If I may join your conversation for a moment, I think it's really interesting to examine our differences, and from there to see (or haha generalize and try not to over-simplify) what those differences mean, if anything.
USA is much older than Canada. If you look at timelines, and especially remember to include Quebec in this, you see a lot about why we've developed the way we did. Quebec is as old as New England, both of which date back to the 1600s. I will leave Newfoundland out, as their separateness (only joining confederation in 1949) makes them a special case. Ontario doesn't have much of anything before 1800, and the rest of the country opens up through the 19th century. Meanwhile, the USA, at least east of the Mississippi had a long and colorful history. Is it any wonder that we in Canada are still figuring out who we are?
USA's revolutionary war actually dictated some of our relationship: because in effect, some people said "we want out of the British Empire", while a number of people said "please let us stay in the British Empire", and came north (United Empire Loyalists). I think this imprints itself in the characters of Canadians and Americans, where one country's ruling myth is the frontier, the impulse to break away, and to do something unprecedented, while the other country's ruling myth is loyalty, obedience, order. No wonder we make great peace-makers and some of the rebels in our midsts make the world's greatest satirists.
Our very understanding of the word "history" is fundamentally different. To the USA i think it means, a tale full of heroes and mythic beings. EVERYONE in US history seems to want to be Paul Bunyan. In Canada, it's to be part of something parliamentary, a discussion where rules are followed and logic prevails: even when we're telling tales concerning irrationality.
They're huge, we are a tiny country who think we're big because we inhabit a vast land. But our population density is tiny, and conditions our sense of ourselves, again in terms of what's beyond our control (nature, weather, bigger countries), and our own discipline.I'd love to hear what others have to say.

olwen
02-25-2010, 09:32 PM
You know what, I've noticed that too. I've taken a lot of Canadian literature classes and so I've been forced to think about the concept of our national identity quite a lot... and I've come to realize that the whole idea is very, very shaky. I've noticed a distinct disinterest in Canadian history and in the idea of national pride... and I've definitely noticed that strange fascination with the United States. It's almost as if we want to know about the U.S. so we can say, "I may not know what "Canadian" is, but I do know that we're not Americans. Stop painting us with the same brush." I've heard a lot of people say that a lack of national identity (or as Mike Myers put it "the essence of not being") is what defines us the most!

I gotta admit I've never ever in my life heard of canadian literature. I don't think I could name one writer who I know is Canadian. I've just never thought of Canada as a maker of great literature. Other forms of art on the other hand yes. There's this sudden wave in indie rock that Canadian's seem to be dominating which if you ask me is a breath of fresh air, and there is of course the long tradition of Canada's place in movies and TV.

I think Americans in general are so geocentric that Canadians might seem exotic even tho you're right next door. I wouldn't even be surprised if some american school kids couldn't even find Canada on a map. There was a kid in my 10th grade (that's grade 10 for you guys LOL) class who couldn't find China. We're not really taught geography or Canadian (or Mexican) history except where your history relates to ours.

TallFatSue
02-26-2010, 12:13 PM
loyalty, obedience, order
Well, I didn't expect this from Canada:

http://www.vancouversun.com/life/Canadian+women+mark+hockey+gold+with+beery+party/2616726/investigate+Team+Canada+behaviour+after+gold+medal/2614284/Photos+Canada+golden+moment+controversy+just+plain/2614266/2614308.bin?size=620x400

This is apropos because I'm one of the few women in management at my company, and some of the other managers have said they consider me "one of the guys". I don't know whether to be insulted or just roll my eyes, but it's probably due to my size: I'm tall as well as fat. I've always been something of a tomboy, but I told my husband to slap me if too many "good old boy" mannerisms rub off onto me, like talking about football or smoking a pipe.

However this photo from Canada women's Olympic hockey team suggests hockey, cigars and beer must be perfectly fine.

Canada, we have soooo much to learn from you. ;)

MattB
02-26-2010, 02:55 PM
People from foreign lands always underestimate our ability to have a good time...we are quite skilled at it. :) Remember, when it comes to hockey all rules of decorum go out the window.

10% of me cringed when I saw this in the news this morning knowing it would be a media frenzy...90% of me was so happy for them. It's not the water up here. They work damn hard at playing this sport! The rest of the world has to catch up to us and the USA for women's hockey or it will be beer for our gals again in Sochi 2014...

Edit- Of course I'm talking about the pic at the bottom of the previous page...

TallFatSue
02-27-2010, 09:23 AM
That's perfectly fine. They're entitled to celebrate, and I thought the photos of the Canadian women's hockey team with cigars and beer were cute. Might I also add that the Canadian women's curling team were great too? My husband asked what I was watching. "Curling. I might learn something next time I need to knock people's heads together at the office." ;)

Stereotypes or no stereotypes, Canada has a certain "je ne sais quoi" that we find so delightful whenever Art & I visit. Québec is foodee heaven, and the culture is fun, and my French is good enough that we get the red carpet treatment. Speaking of food, I'm still debating whether Nova Scotia lobster or Maine lobster is better, or British Columbia salmon or Alaska salmon is better, so methinx we'll need to keep coming back again and again for more, er, "research." Ottawa is a gem of a city, except it's completely infested by politicians (we have that problem too).

Once when we were in Stratford, Ontario for the Shakespeare Festival, a waiter in one of the downtown restaurants probably said it best. "We tell our American friends to be careful, or they just might want to stay here." Well said. We couldn't ask for better neighbors, and we're glad Toledo is close enough to the border that we can visit Canada any time we want. :)

Lest you think I'm sucking up, I do have one huge complaint. Whenever we cross the border, Caesars Windsor Casino turns on those @#$% high-efficiency vacuum cleaners to suck the US dollars out of our purses and wallets. Evil, I tell ya! Evil! :doh:

MattB
02-27-2010, 07:06 PM
That's perfectly fine. They're entitled to celebrate, and I thought the photos of the Canadian women's hockey team with cigars and beer were cute. Might I also add that the Canadian women's curling team were great too? My husband asked what I was watching. "Curling. I might learn something next time I need to knock people's heads together at the office." ;)

Stereotypes or no stereotypes, Canada has a certain "je ne sais quoi" that we find so delightful whenever Art & I visit. Québec is foodee heaven, and the culture is fun, and my French is good enough that we get the red carpet treatment. Speaking of food, I'm still debating whether Nova Scotia lobster or Maine lobster is better, or British Columbia salmon or Alaska salmon is better, so methinx we'll need to keep coming back again and again for more, er, "research." Ottawa is a gem of a city, except it's completely infested by politicians (we have that problem too).

Once when we were in Stratford, Ontario for the Shakespeare Festival, a waiter in one of the downtown restaurants probably said it best. "We tell our American friends to be careful, or they just might want to stay here." Well said. We couldn't ask for better neighbors, and we're glad Toledo is close enough to the border that we can visit Canada any time we want. :)

Lest you think I'm sucking up, I do have one huge complaint. Whenever we cross the border, Caesars Windsor Casino turns on those @#$% high-efficiency vacuum cleaners to suck the US dollars out of our purses and wallets. Evil, I tell ya! Evil! :doh:

That's why Ottawa has the nickname "The Town That Fun Forgot", but it's changing that image rather quickly as it gets bigger and bigger. There's more happening here now...

Sounds like you've been more places in Canada than I have!:)

jenboo
02-28-2010, 12:44 AM
I gotta admit I've never ever in my life heard of canadian literature. I don't think I could name one writer who I know is Canadian. I've just never thought of Canada as a maker of great literature. Other forms of art on the other hand yes. There's this sudden wave in indie rock that Canadian's seem to be dominating which if you ask me is a breath of fresh air, and there is of course the long tradition of Canada's place in movies and TV.

I think Americans in general are so geocentric that Canadians might seem exotic even tho you're right next door. I wouldn't even be surprised if some american school kids couldn't even find Canada on a map. There was a kid in my 10th grade (that's grade 10 for you guys LOL) class who couldn't find China. We're not really taught geography or Canadian (or Mexican) history except where your history relates to ours.

if you want to know of a couple of good authors i can tell ya we have some gooders

gypsy
02-28-2010, 11:46 AM
Hehehe, just had to say ...

Go, Canada! █♥█ http://www.olympic.ca/en/news/canadian-olympic-team-records-best-ever-winter-games/ █♥█

GTAFA
02-28-2010, 12:36 PM
I gotta admit I've never ever in my life heard of canadian literature. I don't think I could name one writer who I know is Canadian. I've just never thought of Canada as a maker of great literature. Other forms of art on the other hand yes. There's this sudden wave in indie rock that Canadian's seem to be dominating which if you ask me is a breath of fresh air, and there is of course the long tradition of Canada's place in movies and TV.

Don't feel bad, I think your ability to name a star writer from Canada is due to one of the big differences between Canada and the USA. Americans make a fuss about every little achievement, like doting parents. It's a lovely quality, really, and we are still learning how to do that (as you may have noticed watching the Olympics). In Canada, we love to see a writer recognized abroad, but are very restrained (or should i say repressed?) in telling the world about our literary heroes.

Here's a list of Canadian writers that you may not have realized were Canadian, including fiction, film, poetry and a few professorial types as well:

Author + a movie you might know based on their work
Margaret Atwood The Handmaid's Tale
Leonard Cohen
Robertson Davies
Marian Engel
Northrop Frye
Mavis Gallant
John Kenneth Galbraith
Grey Owl
Arthur Hailey Airport
Michael Ignatieff
Pauline Johnson
WP Kinsella Field of Dreams
Malcolm Lowry Under the Volcano
Stephen Leacock
Marshall McLuhan
Lucy Maud Montgomery Ann of Green Gables
Brian Moore The Luck of Ginger Coffer
Farley Mowat
Michael Ondaatje The English Patient
Mordechai Richler The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz
Spider Robinson
Gabriel Roy
Robert Service Call of the Wild
Joseph Skvorecky
Michel Tremblay
Margaret Visser
Graham Yost Speed

Esther
03-07-2010, 10:14 PM
I gotta admit I've never ever in my life heard of canadian literature. I don't think I could name one writer who I know is Canadian. I've just never thought of Canada as a maker of great literature. Other forms of art on the other hand yes. There's this sudden wave in indie rock that Canadian's seem to be dominating which if you ask me is a breath of fresh air, and there is of course the long tradition of Canada's place in movies and TV.



Aww... I'm not saying this to make you feel bad at all because I know it's silly, but... I kinda got hurt feelings when I read this, haha. How dumb is that? It's not like I wrote any of it. I think it's just because I LOVE so much Canadian literature. When I go to bookstores I usually browse that section first because I adore it so, so much. I love writers from all around the world, don't get me wrong... but I feel like Canadian writers got this weird reputation for writing nothing but boring, bland literature about nature and farming and it's just not true!!
GTAFA named a lot of good ones. Margaret Atwood is one of my favourites... if you're gonna read her stuff, definitely check out Oryx and Crake as well.
A few others you might want to check out:

Douglas Coupland: I can't even begin to describe him, but I just love him. If you're gonna check him out, read Life After God or All Families Are Psychotic.

Don McKay: I find poetry pretty tedious a lot of the time (especially when it's about nature... snore)... but he has some really cool ideas about what he calls "wilderness" that actually changed the way I looked at the world around me! You can read about them in a book called Vis à Vis but it can be a bit dry. He also wrote an essay called Baler Twine which sums up his ideas pretty well if you don't feel like delving into that one.

Morley Callaghan: This man once punched out Ernest Hemingway... I bet you want to read his books now, right? Read Such Is My Beloved!

Kenneth Oppel: He didn't really write any capital 'L' literature, but he wrote some very unique children's literature. The Silverwing series is written from the perspective of... bats. Weird, but I loved this stuff when I was growing up.

Jane Urquhart: She wrote some of the most lovely novels I've ever read. Away is a great place to start with her.

Alice Munro: A short-story writer. You can pretty much start anywhere with her... it's really all good.

Robert Kroetsch: I suggest reading Gone Indian.

Barbara Gowdy: She deals with a lot of really dark material (see: We So Seldom Look On Love, Helpless), but she also wrote a really interesting novel called The White Bone. It's written from the perspective of a tribe of elephants... sounds weird, but it was excellent.


I can't think of any more off the top of my head (they'll occur to me later and I'll kick myself for not adding them to the list). I really could go on and on about this but I know that's annoying so I'll leave it at this.

gypsy
03-12-2010, 10:44 AM
And don't forget Michael Slade. :bow:

olwen
03-13-2010, 11:26 AM
Aww... I'm not saying this to make you feel bad at all because I know it's silly, but... I kinda got hurt feelings when I read this, haha. How dumb is that? It's not like I wrote any of it. I think it's just because I LOVE so much Canadian literature. When I go to bookstores I usually browse that section first because I adore it so, so much. I love writers from all around the world, don't get me wrong... but I feel like Canadian writers got this weird reputation for writing nothing but boring, bland literature about nature and farming and it's just not true!!
GTAFA named a lot of good ones. Margaret Atwood is one of my favourites... if you're gonna read her stuff, definitely check out Oryx and Crake as well.
A few others you might want to check out:

Douglas Coupland: I can't even begin to describe him, but I just love him. If you're gonna check him out, read Life After God or All Families Are Psychotic.

Don McKay: I find poetry pretty tedious a lot of the time (especially when it's about nature... snore)... but he has some really cool ideas about what he calls "wilderness" that actually changed the way I looked at the world around me! You can read about them in a book called Vis à Vis but it can be a bit dry. He also wrote an essay called Baler Twine which sums up his ideas pretty well if you don't feel like delving into that one.

Morley Callaghan: This man once punched out Ernest Hemingway... I bet you want to read his books now, right? Read Such Is My Beloved!

Kenneth Oppel: He didn't really write any capital 'L' literature, but he wrote some very unique children's literature. The Silverwing series is written from the perspective of... bats. Weird, but I loved this stuff when I was growing up.

Jane Urquhart: She wrote some of the most lovely novels I've ever read. Away is a great place to start with her.

Alice Munro: A short-story writer. You can pretty much start anywhere with her... it's really all good.

Robert Kroetsch: I suggest reading Gone Indian.

Barbara Gowdy: She deals with a lot of really dark material (see: We So Seldom Look On Love, Helpless), but she also wrote a really interesting novel called The White Bone. It's written from the perspective of a tribe of elephants... sounds weird, but it was excellent.


I can't think of any more off the top of my head (they'll occur to me later and I'll kick myself for not adding them to the list). I really could go on and on about this but I know that's annoying so I'll leave it at this.

Aww, I didn't mean to hurt your feelings. I don't think I've ever seen a canadian literature section in any bookstore I've ever been to, but some of the writers you mentioned I do know like Margarat Atwood, Douglas Coupland, Alice Munro, and Jane Urquhart. I just didn't know they were canadian. They would just be listed in the fiction section alphabetically.

olwen
03-13-2010, 11:28 AM
Don't feel bad, I think your ability to name a star writer from Canada is due to one of the big differences between Canada and the USA. Americans make a fuss about every little achievement, like doting parents. It's a lovely quality, really, and we are still learning how to do that (as you may have noticed watching the Olympics). In Canada, we love to see a writer recognized abroad, but are very restrained (or should i say repressed?) in telling the world about our literary heroes.

Here's a list of Canadian writers that you may not have realized were Canadian, including fiction, film, poetry and a few professorial types as well:

Author + a movie you might know based on their work
Margaret Atwood The Handmaid's Tale
Leonard Cohen
Robertson Davies
Marian Engel
Northrop Frye
Mavis Gallant
John Kenneth Galbraith
Grey Owl
Arthur Hailey Airport
Michael Ignatieff
Pauline Johnson
WP Kinsella Field of Dreams
Malcolm Lowry Under the Volcano
Stephen Leacock
Marshall McLuhan
Lucy Maud Montgomery Ann of Green Gables
Brian Moore The Luck of Ginger Coffer
Farley Mowat
Michael Ondaatje The English Patient
Mordechai Richler The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz
Spider Robinson
Gabriel Roy
Robert Service Call of the Wild
Joseph Skvorecky
Michel Tremblay
Margaret Visser
Graham Yost Speed

Wow, more writers I've heard of but didn't know were Canadian. Unfortunately I've only read a few of them.

GTAFA
03-13-2010, 03:29 PM
Wow, more writers I've heard of but didn't know were Canadian. Unfortunately I've only read a few of them.

Haha, to be honest i haven't read that many either. But i saw the movie!

Surlysomething
03-14-2010, 06:30 PM
Aww... I'm not saying this to make you feel bad at all because I know it's silly, but... I kinda got hurt feelings when I read this, haha. How dumb is that? It's not like I wrote any of it. I think it's just because I LOVE so much Canadian literature. When I go to bookstores I usually browse that section first because I adore it so, so much. I love writers from all around the world, don't get me wrong... but I feel like Canadian writers got this weird reputation for writing nothing but boring, bland literature about nature and farming and it's just not true!!
GTAFA named a lot of good ones. Margaret Atwood is one of my favourites... if you're gonna read her stuff, definitely check out Oryx and Crake as well.
A few others you might want to check out:

Douglas Coupland: I can't even begin to describe him, but I just love him. If you're gonna check him out, read Life After God or All Families Are Psychotic.

Don McKay: I find poetry pretty tedious a lot of the time (especially when it's about nature... snore)... but he has some really cool ideas about what he calls "wilderness" that actually changed the way I looked at the world around me! You can read about them in a book called Vis à Vis but it can be a bit dry. He also wrote an essay called Baler Twine which sums up his ideas pretty well if you don't feel like delving into that one.

Morley Callaghan: This man once punched out Ernest Hemingway... I bet you want to read his books now, right? Read Such Is My Beloved!

Kenneth Oppel: He didn't really write any capital 'L' literature, but he wrote some very unique children's literature. The Silverwing series is written from the perspective of... bats. Weird, but I loved this stuff when I was growing up.

Jane Urquhart: She wrote some of the most lovely novels I've ever read. Away is a great place to start with her.

Alice Munro: A short-story writer. You can pretty much start anywhere with her... it's really all good.

Robert Kroetsch: I suggest reading Gone Indian.

Barbara Gowdy: She deals with a lot of really dark material (see: We So Seldom Look On Love, Helpless), but she also wrote a really interesting novel called The White Bone. It's written from the perspective of a tribe of elephants... sounds weird, but it was excellent.


I can't think of any more off the top of my head (they'll occur to me later and I'll kick myself for not adding them to the list). I really could go on and on about this but I know that's annoying so I'll leave it at this.

I LOVE Gail Anderson-Dargatz

gypsy
03-14-2010, 06:49 PM
AND DON'T FORGET MICHAEL SLADE

PewterBunny
06-15-2010, 10:04 AM
OK...looks like there hasn't been any remarks posted on this thread in a while...but it being summer....Canadians have a new set of "quirks"

We have mosquitos large enough to carry off a small child
we do not live in igloos...(as asked by a Carolinan, while I was on holiday)
Kraft Dinner is a staple food and is probably in my emergency kit if OHIO pulls the plug on the electricity again (oooooo gonna hear stuff bout that comment)
Seagulls are everywhere...no only at the waters edge...I've seen them strutting around in farmers fields and they will fight you for a hot dog that dropped off
your fire stick
Poutine check, Maple syrup check, CDN Tire check, Tims check, Brian Adams check-check...
Oh and I always wondered, why a Canadian TV show like Trailer Park Boys,
would have a larger following in the states than here???
Whats with that EH?

Esther
06-17-2010, 11:35 PM
Oh and I always wondered, why a Canadian TV show like Trailer Park Boys,
would have a larger following in the states than here???
Whats with that EH?

Hahaha. It's true though... and Canadians generally didn't watch Due South, but I heard from some of my vacationing friends that it was huge in Scotland!

Tad
06-18-2010, 09:32 AM
Hahaha. It's true though... and Canadians generally didn't watch Due South, but I heard from some of my vacationing friends that it was huge in Scotland!

A lot of Canadians shows get sold internationally.....they usually won't watch them in the US, but if you are in Germany or somewhere, who cares if it comes from Canada or the US? And sometimes they have international partners right from the get-go.

Another Canadian quirk: complaining bitterly about sales taxes, except when Americans are around :p

jenboo
06-22-2010, 12:24 AM
this is a quirk for me and some of the folks that live near the us boarder. It is like we go into the grocery stores and are awed by all the neat stuff you get get in the states but not here....powdered peanut butter! Squeaky Cheese! partridge farm pretzel crisps! Franz boxed donuts.....crazy! The one that really gets me is the awe I felt the first time I went to Jack in the Box at night and was able to order a breakfast sandwich....woooooowoooo.

Esther
06-23-2010, 01:04 AM
this is a quirk for me and some of the folks that live near the us boarder. It is like we go into the grocery stores and are awed by all the neat stuff you get get in the states but not here....powdered peanut butter! Squeaky Cheese! partridge farm pretzel crisps! Franz boxed donuts.....crazy! The one that really gets me is the awe I felt the first time I went to Jack in the Box at night and was able to order a breakfast sandwich....woooooowoooo.

I shop in the US ALL the time, I'm right near the border. I go into the grocery stores for the million and one flavours of Pop-Tarts they carry - Cherry, Cinnamon Roll, Brown Sugar Cinnamon, Cookies and Cream... can't get ANY of that stuff around here.

jenboo
06-23-2010, 08:46 AM
I shop in the US ALL the time, I'm right near the border. I go into the grocery stores for the million and one flavours of Pop-Tarts they carry - Cherry, Cinnamon Roll, Brown Sugar Cinnamon, Cookies and Cream... can't get ANY of that stuff around here.

cherry pepsi and coke! I have just found a nature valley granola bar that is super yum, but have to head over the boarder for it....hmm...i think I may need to plan a little trip soon!!

MattB
07-05-2010, 02:27 PM
I used to love crossing the border to gawk at the stuff you could get in the U.S....They probably get a lot of that down there, Canadians going nuts in their grocery stores...

We are so much alike in many ways, yet still different...